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BYU French & Italian Department

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French

French Studies at BYU
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Italian

Italian Studies at BYU
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News

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“Mormons in Paris”: Two BYU Professors Analyze Mormon Polygamy in French Culture

February 22, 2021 01:34 PM
Professors Corry Cropper and Chris Flood recently published their book "Mormons in Paris" as an analysis of how the French used early Mormon polygamy to satirize French culture in the 1800s.
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Corry Cropper on Albert Camus' The Plague (1947)

July 06, 2020 12:00 AM
Albert Camus’ novel depicts the city of Oran, Algeria during a contemporary outbreak of the plague. While there are obvious parallels between the plague in the novel and the peste brune (the brown plague, a nickname for the Nazis who occupied France during World War 2), by transforming the threat into an act of nature, Camus shifts the focus from human cruelty to the many reactions to suffering: some pretend it doesn’t exist, some try to escape it, others accept it and try to alleviate pain.
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Jennifer Haraguchi - Transcript Social Distancing in Italy (700 Years Ago)

May 24, 2020 12:00 AM
Associate Professor Jennifer Haraguchi (Italian) speaks about the role of the plague in Boccaccio’s Decameron and his unique prescription for a cure: storytelling.
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“Non puoi insegnare niente a un uomo. Puoi solo aiutarlo a scoprire ciò che ha dentro di sé." [You cannot teach a man anything. You can only help him find it within himself.]
- Galileo Galilei